theatlantic:

Revisiting Beyoncé: Could ‘Jealous’ Be Its Most Important Song?

Three months after its release, it’s clear that Beyoncé’s latest album contains one of her most startling messages yet: Maybe she’s wrong.
Read more. [Image: Columbia Records]

theatlantic:

Revisiting Beyoncé: Could ‘Jealous’ Be Its Most Important Song?

Three months after its release, it’s clear that Beyoncé’s latest album contains one of her most startling messages yet: Maybe she’s wrong.

Read more. [Image: Columbia Records]

nevver:

Design Crush
theatlantic:

Life as a Police Officer: Medically and Psychologically Ruinuous

The intensely challenging job of law enforcement is linked to many health issues. I met a former officer who tried to protect my high school friend and learned the effect her death had on him.
Read more. [Image: Lucas Jackson/Reuters]

theatlantic:


Life as a Police Officer: Medically and Psychologically Ruinuous

The intensely challenging job of law enforcement is linked to many health issues. I met a former officer who tried to protect my high school friend and learned the effect her death had on him.

Read more. [Image: Lucas Jackson/Reuters]

I love a lot of American writers, but I think that for the most part the scope of what’s accepted as great American writing is very limited. What we have is good, but it’s limited. There’s not enough engagement with the world. Our literature’s not adventurous enough. The influence of MFA writing tends to make things repetitive. The idea that writing can be taught has changed the whole conversation in the U.S. Aaliya mentions the divergence in American literature, how it’s followed Hemingway and Fitzgerald, but not Faulkner. And that might have come about because you can’t teach Faulkner in class. You can’t say, “Write like Faulkner,” the way you can with Hemingway.

- You want a pint, go to the pub.
- I thought this was a pub.
- It’s a Samoan pub.

(Source: thorins-arkenstone)

Let’s Talk About Movies:

PSYCHO (1960)
Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

Motifs are generally so unobtrusive in a film that they can pass unnoticed even after repeated viewings. In Psycho, for example, Hitchcock employed the “doubles” motif with great density. The 2 pairs of leading actors (Janet Leigh/Vera Miles and Anthony Perkins/John Gavin) were cast according to physical resemblances, which suggest psychological similarities. Many of the scenes feature mirrors, which reinforce the doubles motif, as well as suggesting themes of reality versus illusion, truth versus deception, and conscious behavior versus impulse.

Giannetti, Louis D. Understanding Movies second edition. New Jersey, 1976.

(via sherlocknessmonster)

I believe Peter Lanza still loves Adam Lanza, and loved him all along. I think in some great scale of justice he’s weighed that love against what happened and feels that what happened vastly outweighs his feelings of love.

Andrew Solomon

Solomon interviewed Peter Lanza, the father of Sandy Hook killer Adam Lanza.  He speaks to Fresh Air about what he learned.

(via nprfreshair)

nprfreshair:

Look who’s on the cover of Time Magazine! It’s comedy duo Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele. If you haven’t yet, definitely listen to our interview with them. 

Sure, sometimes at Key & Peele, we swim in the shallow waters of pratfalls, airplane observations and simple old-school punnery. But what we strive for–and what we think more people should strive for–is deeper: to make fun of everything.

You can read their article, “Make Fun Of Everything” here

nprfreshair:

Look who’s on the cover of Time Magazine! It’s comedy duo Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele. If you haven’t yet, definitely listen to our interview with them.

Sure, sometimes at Key & Peele, we swim in the shallow waters of pratfalls, airplane observations and simple old-school punnery. But what we strive for–and what we think more people should strive for–is deeper: to make fun of everything.

You can read their article, “Make Fun Of Everything” here

mrlapadite:

The “Reflection” series of older people looking at their younger selves in mirrors. Alzheimer’s prevents new memories from being retained and in many cases, those afflicted are left with memories of their youth. 

(via butter-to-my-bread)

artmastered:

Gary Hume, Untitled works from the Here’s Flowers series, 2006, linocut prints on paper, Tate

I love the fresh spring colours and complimenting linework of this series by English artist Gary Hume. Numbers 4 and 7 would make great wallpaper, and I, being the boring old soul that I am, absolutely mean than as a compliment.